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Although the first recorded Women's Day was organised by the Socialist Party of America in New York on 28 February 1909, it was a solidarity protest by a group of female textile workers in Russia in 1917 that changed the course of European history.It is the anniversary of their demonstration which is now used to celebrate the day.On the Home Front famine loomed and women from working in the cities factories had had enough.By the middle of the afternoon female textile workers from the Vyborg side of city had gone out on strike shouting "bread" and "down with the Tsar".We have answered some of the most common concerns when it comes to choosing the right site.

A Google search for “dating sites” will bring up hundreds of thousands of results.Join free now and start meeting Russian ladies today!site where you can find a soulmate or just meet new friends. Free is a totally free online dating service, all our services and features are without charges.Women across the globe are honouring the day in their own ways.In the US many are participating in the #ADay Without Women strike against Donald Trump, which has forced two US school districts to close their schools for the day because so many female teachers were going to strike. This strike is the latest in a long history of industrial action by women, but it was one march that happened exactly 100 years ago that has arguably had the greatest impact.On 8 March (23 February in the old Russian calendar) 1917, tens of thousands of women took to the streets of St Petersburg – then called Petrograd – carrying banners demanding the Tsarist government “feed the children of the defenders of the motherland”.