Teen dating awareness

Throughout the month of February, advocates and educators from across the country are focused on the risk factors associated with teen dating violence, and what can be done to prevent it.According to a national survey conducted by the University of New Hampshire Crimes Against Children Research Center, teen victims of dating violence are overwhelmingly more likely to have been victims of other forms of violence, such as sexual violence and child abuse.

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Dating Matters is a comprehensive teen dating violence prevention model that builds upon current evidence-based practice and experience to promote respectful, nonviolent dating relationships among youth.

Dating Matters includes multiple prevention activities that work together to reduce the burden of teen dating violence for individuals, schools, families, and in neighborhoods.

The crime of dating violence—which includes emotional, physical, and sexual assault, as well as harassment via digital communication like texting, email and instant messaging—is a reality for many of our nation's teens.

It is also an issue that is beginning to draw the nation’s attention.

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) now includes language around the issue.

Each year since 2006, the first week in February has been dedicated to increasing public awareness of the prevalence of dating violence among teens and in 2010, Congress designated the entire month to the issue.

Teens who are victims in high school are at higher risk for victimization during college and in adult relationships.

CDC's Division of Violence Prevention is leading the initiative, Dating Matters®: Strategies to Promote Healthy Teen Relationships.

An alarmingly high percentage — 60 percent — had also experienced at least one type of sexual victimization, with the most common types being verbally sexually harassed (30 percent), flashed by a peer (25 percent), and sexually assaulted (20 percent). Among other supporters, baseball legend Joe Torre will speak about the unique role that men can play as mentors to young boys in preventing violence against women and children.

Hurters hurt,” says Esta Soler, Founder and President of Futures Without Violence. In particular, we need to help kids from violent families, kids who have been bullied or kids who have been sexually abused from getting involved or staying in an assaultive relationship.” We’ll be talking about the importance of such programs at a congressional briefing in Washington, D. For more information on our programs to prevent teen dating violence, check out: SAN FRANCISCO (April 27, 2016) – Futures Without Violence (FUTURES) announced today that it received its first Webby Award for That’s Not Cool, a website aimed at preventing teen dating violence and digital abuse.

Did you know that in a recent national survey, 1 in 10 teens reported being hit or physically hurt on purpose by a boyfriend or girlfriend at least once in the 12 months before the survey?